Ramp https://ramp.com We Make Video Valuable Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:55:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 129290335 Microsoft Certifies AltitudeCDN for Microsoft Stream https://ramp.com/enterprise/microsoft-certifies-altitudecdn-microsoft-stream/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/microsoft-certifies-altitudecdn-microsoft-stream/#respond Fri, 14 Oct 2016 14:31:41 +0000 http://ramp.com/?p=15678 Back at the end of September AltitudeCDN™ for Microsoft Stream was recognized as the first eCDN provider to be certified with Microsoft® Stream during an event at Microsoft Ignite in Atlanta GA. Microsoft Stream is a new business video service that democratizes video at work. AltitudeCDN for Microsoft Stream integrates with Stream to manage network distribution and ensure...

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Back at the end of September AltitudeCDN™ for Microsoft Stream was recognized as the first eCDN provider to be certified with Microsoft® Stream during an event at Microsoft Ignite in Atlanta GA.

Microsoft Stream is a new business video service that democratizes video at work. AltitudeCDN for Microsoft Stream integrates with Stream to manage network distribution and ensure seamless delivery of video content, at any scale, across global WANs.

As businesses create and share more video, enterprise networks must be able to keep up, providing fast, high performance streaming and on-demand video.  Ramp AltitudeCDN for Microsoft Stream optimizes video bandwidth use across overloaded enterprise networks without the need for costly upgrades or the installation of desktop client software throughout the enterprise

Additionally, it is the only publicly referenced solution that does not depend on a peer-to-peer (P2P) architecture being deployed within the enterprise, where many organizations have implemented security policies and standards that preclude P2P solutions.

AltitudeCDN™ OmniCache™ is an innovative enterprise caching solution that supports virtually any video source, including Microsoft Stream, Azure Media Services, Brightcove, and Microsoft Office Video. OmniCache supports both live and on-demand video, for a single, cost-effective approach to enterprise video distribution.

We’re is a partner provider for both Microsoft Azure and Stream. The certification comes on the heels of our partner announcements with other industry-leading organizations such as Wowza, Panopto, and Sonic Foundry, which together demonstrate the broad recognition of AltitudeCDN as the best-of-breed, next generation solution for the enterprise video market.

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Thoughts on Network Video Delivery https://ramp.com/enterprise/thoughts-network-video-delivery/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/thoughts-network-video-delivery/#respond Wed, 31 Aug 2016 16:53:32 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=15448 Storing video is a problem that seems to be top of mind for everyone, but delivering video over a network is a different beast entirely. Video files are large, and are only getting larger as resolution and quality improve, resulting in a drastic increase in the amount of traffic that’s going over your network. Because...

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Storing video is a problem that seems to be top of mind for everyone, but delivering video over a network is a different beast entirely. Video files are large, and are only getting larger as resolution and quality improve, resulting in a drastic increase in the amount of traffic that’s going over your network. Because of this, you’re going to want to consider an eCDN partner that can integrate with your existing video delivery infrastructure and ensure the smooth delivery of content over your network.

Caching is a simple but powerful solution for optimizing and handling vast amounts of video data streaming across your network. Our caching solution, AltitudeCDN OmniCache, acts as a reverse network proxy, caching redundant requests for video on your local network. This means that while the first user to request a video will receive the source over the WAN, subsequent requests for the same content from within your network will be delivered locally from the cache, helping you optimize your video distribution with very little interaction from your client software, to the point where your end users won’t even know it’s there.

Unlike other caching solutions, OmniCache also works with both HTTP and HTTPS delivery. Normally HTTPS isn’t cachable, but the patented technology powering OmniCache enables the delivery of a video payload inside an encrypted packet that is then wrapped in plain HTTP, meaning the payload remains secure, while making the content cachable.

We hope this post gave you a little more insight into the positive effects caching software can have on your network infrastructure!

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The Future of Multicast is Here https://ramp.com/enterprise/the-end-of-multicast-as-we-know-it/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/the-end-of-multicast-as-we-know-it/#respond Wed, 17 Aug 2016 13:46:43 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=15413 Enterprises have relied on the stability and scalability of the multicast protocol for decades. Recently, however, legacy multicast-enabling software from Microsoft and Adobe has reached a plateau.  Microsoft’s Silverlight and Windows Media Server have officially reach end-of-life status, while Adobe’s Flash Player is clearly moving in that direction. These developments are causing corporate IT departments to...

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Enterprises have relied on the stability and scalability of the multicast protocol for decades. Recently, however, legacy multicast-enabling software from Microsoft and Adobe has reached a plateau.  Microsoft’s Silverlight and Windows Media Server have officially reach end-of-life status, while Adobe’s Flash Player is clearly moving in that direction. These developments are causing corporate IT departments to ask, “what is the future of multicast and can we continue to rely on multicast for live streaming?”

It’s a fair question given how the multicast market has unfolded over the past couple of years, and a worrisome thought for enterprises that have come to rely on multicast. But, before fear takes over, take heart. The answer to the question is yes. Yes, enterprise IT departments can continue to rely on multicast just like they always have. Yes, it’s the end of an era for legacy multicasting software, but there is an even brighter and compelling future ahead for the multicast protocol.

The future of multicast is AltitudeCDN™ Multicast+. Ramp developed AltitudeCDN Multicast+ with modern streaming protocols and current-day corporate network and infrastructure configurations at top of mind. Multicast+ supports the classic multicast use cases, which enterprises have long used; but, our software also enables new use cases that were previously impossible.

Multicast+ is the best option for reaching all your viewers with high-quality, stable transmissions, but without proprietary infrastructure, custom video players, or invasive P2P clients. It leverages – and improves on – multicast technology to provide a standards-based (H.264, HLS, HTML5) solution for cost-effective and easy deployment that doesn’t require network capacity upgrades. Forward error correction (FEC), combined with bandwidth smoothing, deliver a seamless, high-quality viewer experience, even over Wi-Fi connections.

Learn more at ramp.com

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Using Deep Search to Extract More Value From Your Video in SharePoint https://ramp.com/enterprise/getting-value-video-sharepoint/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/getting-value-video-sharepoint/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2016 15:34:53 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=15402 If you’re already using SharePoint as a content management system for text documents, then why invest in a separate platform to manage your video content? Video documents should live side-by-side with text-based documents, integrated into the same search and available within the same interface. And, searching for and discovering a video should not be dependent upon...

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If you’re already using SharePoint as a content management system for text documents, then why invest in a separate platform to manage your video content?

Video documents should live side-by-side with text-based documents, integrated into the same search and available within the same interface. And, searching for and discovering a video should not be dependent upon how well you titled and tagged the document upon uploading. It should be based on the true contents of the video — the audio hidden within.

To extract the full value from your video documents, you need to have rich search capabilities that enable your end-users to discover video on-demand (VoD) content based on the spoken word within the video. By having rich search capabilities for video content, not just meta tags, but a full audio transcript, you are able to search the true contents of a video.

Does your video solution provide this capability? Are you interested in learning more? If so, contact us today!

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Modern Multicast vs. Peer-to-Peer for Enterprise Video Delivery https://ramp.com/enterprise/p2p-isnt-always-answer/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/p2p-isnt-always-answer/#respond Tue, 21 Jun 2016 14:02:44 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=15355 Now that Microsoft has discontinued support for Windows Media Server and Microsoft Silverlight, and with Adobe Flash Player seemingly on its last leg, we’re hearing questions about the viability of peer-to-peer (P2P) as an alternative to multicast for enterprise video delivery. For decades, Microsoft and Adobe have developed proprietary software that enabled multicasting, but with...

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Now that Microsoft has discontinued support for Windows Media Server and Microsoft Silverlight, and with Adobe Flash Player seemingly on its last leg, we’re hearing questions about the viability of peer-to-peer (P2P) as an alternative to multicast for enterprise video delivery. For decades, Microsoft and Adobe have developed proprietary software that enabled multicasting, but with the discontinuation of Microsoft’s multicast software and the continued security issues with Flash, organizations are asking, “now what?”

Do these recent events mean it is time to look for an alternative for multicast? And, if so, is peer-to-peer (P2P) a viable alternative?

Sure, P2P is an alternative, but it still can’t compete with the simplicity, scalability and security of the multicast protocol. Just because the legacy software for multicasting is now obsolete doesn’t change the time-tested reliability of the multicast protocol and it doesn’t erase its inherent benefits.

If anything, today’s multicast software represents an evolution from Microsoft and Adobe’s traditional offerings. This includes standards-based (H.264, HLS, HTML5) solutions that are cost-effective and easy to deploy. In addition, new features such as forward error correction (FEC) and bandwidth smoothing allow today’s advanced multicast solutions to deliver high-quality viewer experiences, even over Wi-Fi connections.

When evaluating P2P as a solution for delivering live video within the enterprise, it’s important to consider the complete deployment implications of a software-defined network, like P2P, against the benefits of a modern multicast solution. P2P is a heavy weight solution. Regardless of your environment and deployment schemes, implementation and maintenance can be costly. In addition, P2P is inefficient over wireless networks due to the heavy chatter between peers, resulting in an increase in wireless traffic.

The unnecessary overhead and security issues associated with P2P aren’t worth it, especially when you already have the infrastructure in place to deploy a multicast solution that solves all of the challenges of delivering video over your enterprise network. A secure and more lightweight multicast solution that works over wireless networks is the better path forward for your organization.

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Continued Pattern of Security Risks in Legacy Video Technology Highlights the Immediate Need for HTML5 Video Solutions https://ramp.com/enterprise/continued-pattern-security-risks-legacy-video-technology-highlights-immediate-need-html5-video-solutions/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/continued-pattern-security-risks-legacy-video-technology-highlights-immediate-need-html5-video-solutions/#respond Wed, 11 May 2016 16:36:02 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=15279 As HTML5 gains momentum and cements itself as the industry standard, the proprietary technologies it replaces continue to be security risks. And none of these legacy technologies had an impressive Spring. In early April, Adobe issued an emergency update to Flash Player after mass ransomware attacks. Adobe published a security bulletin on the topic, which...

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As HTML5 gains momentum and cements itself as the industry standard, the proprietary technologies it replaces continue to be security risks. And none of these legacy technologies had an impressive Spring.

In early April, Adobe issued an emergency update to Flash Player after mass ransomware attacks. Adobe published a security bulletin on the topic, which summarized the security vulnerabilities this way:

“Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and ChromeOS. These updates address critical vulnerabilities that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

The term “critical vulnerability” doesn’t engender confidence. And yet, this isn’t the only critical vulnerability Flash Player has experienced in the past 12 months. A quick Google search for “timeline of Adobe Flash security flaws” returns the following results just on the first page.

Adobe Flash's security flaws prove we need to move to HTML5 Flash Must DieAdobe Flash Player: List of security vulnerabilitiesAdobe Flash Vulnerabilities - a never-ending stringAdobe has an epically abysmal security record

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clearly, it’s not news that Flash has security issues. Just look at the last result from money.cnn.com, which lists critical security vulnerabilities in Adobe products every year from 2007 to 2013, when the article was published.

To be fair, Adobe is not the only vendor with security challenges. Apple recently had its own security issues with QuickTime. In April, the US Department of Homeland Security notified Windows users about two known security flaws with Apple QuickTime, advising them to uninstall the software altogether. Unlike Adobe, Apple had already cut bait and no longer keeps QuickTime on life support. The last update to QuickTime was in January of this year, and Apple has confirmed it will no longer update QuickTime for PC’s.

Interestingly, the two products share one important trait. Both have a proper noun before their name. Both are proprietary products developed and maintained by one company. And, most importantly, executives at both Apple and Adobe have arrived at the same conclusion that their once integral video-enabling technologies are no longer strategic.

Apple has publicly abandoned QuickTime. And, while Adobe has not made any public statements admitting their perennial cash cow is no longer part of their long-term strategy, their actions speak louder than words. Adobe’s increased focus on HTML5 video support in both Creative Cloud and Adobe Experience Manager clearly demonstrates its recognition of HTML5 as the dominant standard moving forward.

The security and performance issues that plague Adobe Flash are rooted in its proprietary nature. Keeping Adobe Flash Player up-to-date, in a constantly changing universe of security threats, is the sole responsibility of Adobe, using whatever resources and skills they choose to dedicate. In today’s world of ingenious and continuously evolving hacks, it’s hugely challenging and expensive to single-handedly maintain the security and performance of an enabling technology such as Flash Player.

There is another factor at play as well. Flash Player’s security issues have been exacerbated recently because Adobe realized Flash Player is no longer a strategic play. And why continue to invest in a dying product?

Adobe and Apple likely foresaw the marginalization of Flash and QuickTime in the face of standards-based technology years back. For the rest of us, there is an alternative now to the risks of a vulnerable platform. HTML5 video has arrived as the standard and is ready to go; it is a tangible and robust replacement to Flash.

Yet, for many organizations, Adobe Flash is still integral to enterprise video infrastructures. The reason is straightforward: until recently, a number of enterprise video use cases were only possible with Flash as a piece of the solution.

High-profile examples of this continued dependency are all around us in the form of the live webcast. Securely broadcasting a CEO Town Hall, an earnings call, or executive presentations to tens of thousands of employees viewing from offices around the globe with secure and reliable transmissions has traditionally relied on multicast supported by Flash.

Despite the imminent demise of Flash Player, many enterprise content delivery network (eCDN) solutions require Flash for streaming live video via multicast.

Those eCDN vendors with products built upon Flash pose significant security liabilities and risk obsolescence as the market moves ahead without them.

Enterprises looking to move on from Flash Player may consider abandoning multicast altogether in favor of a peer-to-peer (P2P) video platform. And while P2P vendors claim to be a worthy heir to multicast for video delivery, this technology compares unfavorably to multicast when it comes to simplicity and security. A P2P overhaul is unnecessarily complex and cumbersome in a world with end-to-end solutions enabling the streaming of Flash-less HTML5 video via multicast. So with this “best of both worlds” capability (no Flash and no complex overhead) the barriers to HTML5 live streaming adoption have dropped significantly.

It’s important to understand the significant advantage HTML5 video has over Flash and other proprietary video technologies. With standardization, the entire ecosystem can focus on maintaining one technology (HTML5) instead of companies focusing their individual resources on trying to keep a proprietary technology secure, up-to-date and performing at a high level. The continuing news of major security liabilities with legacy proprietary video players highlight the need for a standardized technology. The days of struggling to “go it alone” with siloed, outmoded video-enabling technologies are a relic of business models that no longer make sense for anyone.

The point is this: Flash has had an agonizingly slow death, but its final days have arrived. The emergence of a standard – HTML5 video –  has put the final nail in Flash Player’s proverbial coffin. Proprietary video technologies must quickly give way to a standard that ensures the security of all corporate users.

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The Dawn of HTML5 Video as the Enterprise Standard https://ramp.com/enterprise/the-dawn-of-html5-video-as-the-enterprise-standard/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/the-dawn-of-html5-video-as-the-enterprise-standard/#respond Wed, 03 Feb 2016 19:33:23 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=14903 Microsoft’s discontinued support for IE 8, 9 and 10 accelerates enterprise adoption of new browsers and subsequently ushers in the dawn of HTML5 video as the dominant standard for enterprise content.  Microsoft recently announced discontinued support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10. While the Redmond, Washington-based software giant has positioned this as a security...

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Microsoft’s discontinued support for IE 8, 9 and 10 accelerates enterprise adoption of new browsers and subsequently ushers in the dawn of HTML5 video as the dominant standard for enterprise content. 

Microsoft recently announced discontinued support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10. While the Redmond, Washington-based software giant has positioned this as a security and support-driven decision, there is a broader implication for the enterprise video market. Officially cutting ties with the older versions of Internet Explorer ushers in the dawn of HTML5 video as the dominant standard for enterprise content.

What does this mean on the surface?

Microsoft is acting to accelerate enterprise migration to the new Microsoft browsers to avoid continued investment into maintaining outdated editions – editions that are increasingly exploited by hackers and are no longer a piece of Microsoft’s strategic game plan. Interestingly, this action is as predictable as it is unexpected.

It’s predictable because we’ve already seen this behavior from Microsoft. In July, Microsoft incentivized their customers by offering free upgrades to their then newly released operating system, Windows 10, and subsequently a new default browser, Microsoft Edge.

Yet, it’s also shocking because many enterprises have deep integrations with IE 8, 9 and 10. Over the course of time, companies have built large, complex systems designed specifically for one of these older versions. As such, the substantial resources required for updating their systems and browsers to IE 11/Edge has kept many enterprises from updating up to this point.

What are the implications for enterprise video?

In one sense, IT organizations are having their hands forced. With Microsoft no longer providing security updates and patches for IE 8, 9 and 10, enterprises have to move quickly or leave themselves vulnerable to security breaches.

In another sense, once running IE 11/Edge, enterprises now have access to a video technology that was heretofore unavailable. IE 8, 9 and 10 did not support HTML5 without a plugin. The only option was Flash video. With underlying support for HTML5 in IE 11/Edge, enterprises can choose between Flash video and HTML5.

The migration to modern browsers will not hinder the current use and deployment of Flash because it is still supported on IE 11/Edge, but the option is there going forward. And it’s really not a tough decision to make.

HTML5 has a number of technical advantages over Flash, such as native support for all desktop and mobile operating systems/platforms, as well as better performance with lower CPU utilization on Apple and mobile devices.

Due to the technical advantages of HTML5, and the major security concerns associated with Flash, the underlying HTML5 video support enabled through migration to IE 11/Edge will make Flash the least attractive option going forward.

Although HTML5 has been earmarked as the streaming protocol of the future, enterprise video vendors have been slow to adopt HTML5 video technology into their platforms because of a classic “chicken or the egg” situation.

Enterprise video vendors delayed development of HTML5 video solutions until the market justified it, i.e., until the majority of enterprise desktop browsers fully supported HTML5. On the other hand, with the market devoid of a compelling HTML5 solution, enterprises lacked the impetus to dedicate resources in global browser upgrades.

Vendors who designed their underlying architecture to support HTML5 are now best positioned in the enterprise video market – a market in which HTML5 video is destined to become the standard for enterprise video.

 

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After Security, Analytics is Most Vital Feature for Enterprise Video Platforms https://ramp.com/enterprise/after-security-analytics-is-the-most-vital-feature-to-enterprise-video-platforms/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/after-security-analytics-is-the-most-vital-feature-to-enterprise-video-platforms/#respond Mon, 14 Dec 2015 19:50:28 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=14799 The core requirement of an enterprise video delivery platform is well understood throughout the market. Secure video delivery is paramount for behind-the-firewall, enterprise use cases, and it is the primary distinction between an enterprise video platform and an online video platform, the latter used to serve video content to a broad, public audience. While most...

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The core requirement of an enterprise video delivery platform is well understood throughout the market. Secure video delivery is paramount for behind-the-firewall, enterprise use cases, and it is the primary distinction between an enterprise video platform and an online video platform, the latter used to serve video content to a broad, public audience.

While most all vendors developing an enterprise video platform correctly place security at the fore of their strategic offering, they miss the boat when it comes to usability. Usability for the employee viewer means video fits seamlessly into their existing daily workflows. Plus, usability is just as important for the administrator, who is responsible not only for providing video resources and tools to employees, but for putting video views and employee activity in context, helping the enterprise understand the value video brings to the organization. For the administrator, a key aspect of usability is having access to tightly integrated reporting and analytics tools to track statistics on a ‘per employee’ or ‘per video’ basis.

That’s right. The second most important attribute of an enterprise video platform is its analytics and reporting capabilities. These tools allow an enterprise to monitor, understand and manage its use of video and consumption by employees.

The latest release of the Ramp Video Management (RVM) for SharePoint app now provides a comprehensive analysis of on-demand video use with a full suite of analytics and reporting tools. Enterprises require video analytics for a variety of use cases. Compliance officers need to know if an employee has watched required video content vital to their job performance and/or required by safety and regulatory regulations. Internal training departments extract value from video analytics by examining trends and relationships between videos and viewers.

Video is increasingly at the center of enterprise internal communications strategies, allowing businesses to expand the lines of communication between global employees. Enterprises are now looking for capabilities well beyond a simple ability to broadly track video consumption; and the Ramp team has Ramp’d up our SharePoint solution to meet this need.

Ramp Video Management’s comprehensive analytics platform is unrivalled, allowing administrators and ‘Internal Training’ or ‘Compliance’ supervisors a granular and customizable view into the consumption of their videos. Let’s break it down!

Filters

RVM’s analytics platform lets you dig into the data with filters for individual viewers, videos and date/time history. When accessing the analytics dashboard, the reports will by default show the aggregate numbers for all video activity for a given SharePoint site. However, selecting any combination of the built-in filters allows an administrator to refine their results. Once defining the search filters, the reports, graphs and charts will automatically refresh to reflect the new data points.

Ramp Video Analytics: Dashboard

Filters for ‘Viewer’ and ‘Title’ segment the data to show results for each individual user and video document. The ‘Time’ filter has two options: ‘Simple’ and ‘Advanced.’ The ‘Advanced’ filter provides a date-by-date picker for a look at the data over a custom time period. For example, the advanced time filter can be set to view analytics data occurring one hour, one minute, or even one second in the past.

Ramp Video Analytics: Filter by Time

Overall Activity Report

Beneath “Filters” on the analytics dashboard is “Overall Activity Report.” This report is a table with a high-level snapshot of the total analytics associated with your viewers and videos. This includes:

  • Total Views – (including repeat views of a video by the same person)
  • Unique Viewers – (the number of individuals who have viewed the video)
  • In-Video Searches – (metadata searches made within the player)
  • Minutes Viewed – (total)
  • Average View Time – (in minutes)

Ramp Analytics: Overall Activity Report

Daily Views

The ‘Daily Views’ report provides a daily breakdown of video views. Ramp’s integrated analytics platform tracks every video view by date (and time), and displays this information clearly in the ‘Daily Views’ graph. Hovering over a bar reveals video views for that specific date. This count also includes repeat views of a video, or repeat views made by the same person, depending on the filters you select.

Ramp Video Analytics: Daily Views

Top Videos & Top Viewers

The ‘Top Videos’ and ‘Top Viewers’ report shows (when no filters are applied) the most watched videos and the employee user consuming the most video content. By simply applying the filters at the top of the page, the report can be refreshed to show a much more detailed set of data points. For example, by selecting an individual employee, the graph will show total video views for that individual employee. And, of those views, which video content was the most popular.

Similarly, you can see which of your users are accumulating the most video views in the ‘Top Viewers’ report. The graph displayed on the right below tracks views by person rather than video. As with other reports, hovering over any bar in ‘Top Viewers’ report adjacent to a person’s name reveals their individual view count.
Ramp Video Analytics: Top Videos

 

Ramp Video Analytics: Top Viewers

 

User Engagement: % of video viewed

Scrolling down the page, the ‘User Engagement’ report shows the view count for a percent of a certain video. Hovering over the points in the graph where the X and Y axes intercept reveals the view count for that percentage portion of the selected video. This tracking is useful in compliance situations. For example, using the ‘Viewer’ filter uncover statistics for a specific user shows if they watched the full duration of any given video.

Ramp Video Analytics: Percentage of Video Viewed

Top In-Video Search Queries

Ramp’s unique player has a search box that viewers can use to search for spoken terms within the video and jump to their exact, time-stamped instances. The RVM analytics platform tracks these search queries and displays them as a word cloud. The more frequently a term is searched for, the larger it appears here. This provides visibility into what kind of information users are searching for most often.

Ramp Video Analytics: Top In-Video Search Queries

Viewer & Video Reports

The ‘Viewer Report’ breaks down all activity displayed for each viewer. The analytics data displayed in this table includes the following for an individual user:

  • Total Views – (including repeat views of the same video)
  • In-video Searches – (total number of searches conducted by viewer within the video player)
  • Max Percent Viewed – (The maximum percent – based on the selected filter criteria, or the average of all videos – that the person has viewed)
  • Minutes Viewed – (total)
  • View Time – (in minutes)

Ramp Video Analytics: Viewer Report

Much like the ‘Viewer Report’, the ‘Video Report’ provides a tabular breakdown of the activity around your video(s). The following data for individual video titles is included here:

  • Total Views (includes repeat views by the same person)
  • Unique Viewers (individual viewers, excluding repeat viewers)
  • In-video Searches
  • Max Percent Viewed
  • Minutes Viewed
  • View Time

Ramp Video Analytics: Video Report

Downloading as .CSV

Admins have the ability to download all data as a .CSV file so they can further manipulate the data with even more charts, graphs and visualizations. This feature is also idea for quick data transfer.

Get the Solution Brief to learn more:

Ramp Video Management Solution Brief

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Live Streaming: Tips & Tricks for Your Next Event https://ramp.com/enterprise/live-streaming-tips-tricks-for-your-next-event/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/live-streaming-tips-tricks-for-your-next-event/#respond Tue, 24 Nov 2015 16:27:14 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=14786 Live streaming doesn’t have to be difficult. And thanks to new webcasting platforms, not all webcasts need to be white glove affairs. They can be simple to set-up and produce. But as simple as the technology has become, nothing beats the experience you get from having a couple webcasts under your belt. Having live streamed...

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Live streaming doesn’t have to be difficult. And thanks to new webcasting platforms, not all webcasts need to be white glove affairs. They can be simple to set-up and produce. But as simple as the technology has become, nothing beats the experience you get from having a couple webcasts under your belt.

Having live streamed our own customer conference, Ramp Innovations, the keynotes and panels at SPTechCon in Boston, and countless others, we’ve picked up a lot of tips and tricks for live streaming. In this video, Brian Prigge, Ramp’s Senior Manager of Product Engineering and Live Streaming Extraordinaire, talks about some of the key factors to consider when streaming a live event.

Although many of the events we’ve streamed were of high production value, it can be much simpler. The great thing about some of today’s webcasting platforms is their adaptability. For example, streaming a live event on the Ramp Video Live platform to hundreds, thousands or tens of thousands of viewers only requires SharePoint access, a webcam, and optionally a PowerPoint presentation for synchronized slides. In this scenario, live webcasting is truly self-service, so an executive at a global enterprise can broadcast town halls and team meetings without IT assistance. But swap the out webcam for a team of high-end cameras/capture station and you can stream as high-end of a production as you desire.

Learn more about Ramp Video Live, the easiest way for global enterprises to broadcast live meetings to a broad and distributed audience.
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Feeling the Heat from Unreliable Webcasting? https://ramp.com/enterprise/feeling-the-heat-from-unreliable-webcasting/ https://ramp.com/enterprise/feeling-the-heat-from-unreliable-webcasting/#respond Thu, 12 Nov 2015 16:54:46 +0000 http://www.ramp.com/?p=14769 The point of a live webcast is to create a virtual shared experience, to deliver a seamless message to a unified audience, and to articulate important messages in a way that engages viewers and brings ideas to life. A live webcast is a more dynamic and impactful version of an email memo, or even a video...

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The point of a live webcast is to create a virtual shared experience, to deliver a seamless message to a unified audience, and to articulate important messages in a way that engages viewers and brings ideas to life.

A live webcast is a more dynamic and impactful version of an email memo, or even a video recording. As such, they are saved for delivering important messages. But too often they have the adverse effect due to poor webcasting quality.

Our #SaveYourCEO video series depicts the typical problems with webcasting technology, problems that undermine the intended goal of a live webcast. Check out the third video in our ongoing series to see the mess our CEO gets into this time.

Check out SaveYourCEO.com to see the full series and how you can #SaveYourCEO from unreliable webcasting.

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