Credit default swap

What is a credit default swap?

A credit default swap (CDS) is a financial contract that allows one party to transfer the credit risk of a reference entity to another party. The reference entity is usually a bond, loan, or other financial instrument. The buyer of the CDS makes periodic payments to the seller, and in exchange, the seller agrees to pay the buyer the full face value of the reference entity if it defaults.

How do credit default swaps work?

Credit default swaps are used to hedge against credit risk or to speculate on the creditworthiness of a particular entity. For example, if an investor owns a bond issued by a company, they can buy a CDS to hedge against the risk of that company defaulting on its debt. If the company does default, the CDS will pay out, and the investor will be protected. Conversely, if the investor believes a company is likely to default, they can buy a CDS in the hope of making a profit if the company does indeed default.

What are the benefits of credit default swaps?

CDS contracts offer a number of benefits, including the ability to transfer credit risk, hedge against potential losses, and speculate on the creditworthiness of entities. CDS contracts are also relatively easy to trade and are often used to speculate on the creditworthiness of companies or countries.

What are the risks of credit default swaps?

There are a number of risks associated with credit default swaps. These include counterparty risk, basis risk, and credit event risk. Counterparty risk is the risk that the other party to the contract will not fulfill their obligations. Basis risk is the risk that the reference entity will not default when expected. Credit event risk is the risk that a credit event will occur, such as a bankruptcy or restructuring.

How are credit default swaps priced?

Credit default swaps are typically priced using a spread. The spread is the difference between the CDS contract's price and the price of the underlying reference entity. The spread is typically quoted in basis points (bps). For example, if the spread on a CDS contract is 100 bps, this means that the CDS contract costs 100 bps more than the price of the underlying reference entity.

What are the types of credit default swaps?

There are two main types of credit default swaps: single-name CDS and index CDS. Single-name CDS contracts reference a specific bond or loan, while index CDS contracts reference a basket of bonds or loans. Index CDS contracts are typically used to hedge against the risk of multiple entities defaulting.

What is the history of credit default swaps?

Credit default swaps were first introduced in the late 1990s. They were initially used to hedge against the risk of corporate bond defaults. However, over time, they have become increasingly popular and are now used to hedge against the risk of a wide range of financial instruments, including sovereign bonds and loans.

Who uses credit default swaps?

Credit default swaps are used by a wide range of market participants, including banks, hedge funds, and insurance companies. They are also used by investors to speculate on the creditworthiness of companies or countries.

What regulations govern credit default swaps?

Credit default swaps are regulated by a number of national and international bodies. In the United States, they are regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In Europe, they are regulated by the European Securities and Markets Authority.

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No credit checks or founder guarantee, with 10-20x higher limits.
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